Car Accident Prevention Tips


Safety Tip: Car Accident Prevention

Car accidentCountless people die in car accidents every year. The majority of incidents that occur are passenger vehicle accidents. Car accidents are mainly caused by the driver. Bad weather and sketchy road conditions are other causes of accidents. Car accident prevention is an important step to make to lower these high numbers.

To prevent car accident, it is imperative for the car owners to be incredibly cautious while behind the wheel in order to end the large amount of car accidents happening yearly. There are various safety driving rules that drivers must follow to decrease the risk of an accident. If all individuals would follow these simple road guidelines. The number of accidents would decrease substantially.

  1. Don’t tailgate: Crowding the car ahead of you makes it more likely you’ll smash into it if the driver should suddenly brake. Modern safety devices such as anti-lock brakes and traction control.
  2. Wear your seat belt. Wearing your seatbelt is one of the most important things you can do to survive a car crash. Make sure that your lap belt sits low on your hip bones and that the shoulder belt goes across the center of your chest. Children should be seated in proper child restraints until they are large enough to properly wear a lap and shoulder belt.
  3. Obey the three second rule: Every driver should know and heed the three second rule: When the vehicle ahead of you passes a fixed object (such as a tree or telephone pole) slowly count “one thousand, two one thousand, three one thousand.” If you reach the object before completing the count, you’re following too closely. Double your following distance (to six seconds) in poor weather.
  4. Use turn signals: Failing to signal your intentions to other motorists is always dangerous – as well as discourteous. Other motorists are not witches/wizards; they can’t guess that you are planning on making a left turn – or about to move into the next lane. Signaling is very important for the safety of motorcyclists, bicyclists and pedestrians, too. If they are in your blind spot and you just assume no one’s there and execute a maneuver without signaling first, these folks will get no advance warning — and will suffer the most if you strike them.
  5. Drive a safe car which is fitted with seat belts and other safety features. Do not sit in a seat which has no head support. Older cars, which may just have lap belts and almost never have any additional safety features, are generally less safe than large vehicles. SUVs tend to be more prone to rollover accidents than cars. Try to drive the safest car that suits your needs and budget.
  6. Store objects such that they will not hit you if the car gets hit. If an object could become a projectile during a crash, either remove it from the car, or stow it in the trunk, or, in the case of a minivan, in the well behind the seat.
  7. Don’t impede the flow of traffic: Driving too slowly can be more dangerous than driving a little faster than the posted limit. In a high-density situation, with many other vehicles sharing the road, a dawdler creates what amounts to a rolling roadblock. Traffic snarls; motorists jockey for position – the smooth flow of cars is interrupted. Try to drive with the flow of traffic – and if the car behind you clearly wishes to go faster, the best thing to do is let it get by, whether you are “doing the limit” already or not. The other driver may have an emergency you are unaware of – and in any event, it is simply safer and more courteous to yield to faster-moving traffic. Leave enforcement of speed limits to the police.
  8. Maintain appropriate speed: Speed, as such, doesn’t kill. If it did, airliners traveling at 500 mph would have the highest accident/fatality rates of any form of transportation. But air travel is in fact much safer than driving — and few cars travel at 500 mph. The problem is inappropriate speed. For example, while it may be perfectly legal to drive 65 mph on the highway, if you don’t slow down when it’s raining heavily (or snowing) and your visibility as well as your car’s stopping ability is reduced – you increase your chances of having an accident. Similarly, if you are driving an unfamiliar road, especially a country road with many blind curves, you may not be able to negotiate the road at the same speed a local might with equal safety. Use your judgment – and adjust speed to match conditions and your comfort level.
  9. Plan ahead/use your mirrors: Anticipate the need to brake or make lane changes, etc. by constantly scanning your driving environment and watching the actions of other drivers, pedestrians and so on. This way, it’s less likely you’ll need to jam on the brakes – or make sudden steering changes – to avoid problems. The best drivers always maintain “situational awareness” – where other cars are in relation to their vehicle, what’s coming up ahead – and what’s happening on either side of them and behind them. Use your mirrors – frequently.
  10. Drive a safe car which is fitted with seat belts and other safety features. Do not sit in a seat which has no head support. Older cars, which may just have lap belts and almost never have any additional safety features, are generally less safe than large vehicles. SUVs tend to be more prone to rollover accidents than cars. Try to drive the safest car that suits your needs and budget.
  11. Store objects such that they will not hit you if the car gets hit. If an object could become a projectile during a crash, either remove it from the car, or stow it in the trunk, or, in the case of a minivan, in the well behind the seat.
  12. Make sure the safety systems on your car are serviced regularly. Airbags and seat-belts significantly reduce injury and death in automobile accidents.
  13. Make sure your car’s engine, brakes, transmissions, suspension and tires are in good condition. The safest accident is the one you don’t get in; having your car in top running condition can help you avoid an accident or minimize harm in case you get in an accident.
  14. Drive within your limits, the limits set by conditions and the limits of your vehicle: SUVs are not as equipped as sporty cars to travel safely at higher speeds – and sporty cars tend to get lively much more readily when it rains/snows. Older vehicles lacking modern tires or traction/stability enhancers don’t have the same built-in edge as late model cars with those features. You’ll need more time to slow down safely; the older car will also go into a skid with less provocation than a newer car equipped with an electronic stability aid. Don’t drive faster than you – or your vehicle – can drive safely, with ample “cushion” of time and space to make corrections and react to changing conditions and other motorists.
  15. If you have the desire to become an even better driver – and learn how to handle emergency situations such as panic braking and loss of vehicle control – you may want to attend a driving school where you’ll learn about vehicle handling dynamics on a closed course track under expert supervision.
  16. Parents and caregivers can:
    a) Use a seat belt on every trip, no matter how short. This sets a good example.b) Not all car seats will fit all cars so choosing the best one for the weight and height of the child is really important.

    c) Most accidents happen in short journeys close to home so make sure car seats are easy to fit – If it’s hard to fit then it may be tempting not to use it on shorter journeys.

    d) Make sure children are properly buckled up in a seat belt, booster seat, or car seat, whichever is appropriate for their age, height and weight:

    i. Rear-facing car seats. Infants should stay in rear-facing car seats as long as possible. Ideally, infants should remain in rear-facing car seats until they reach 2 years of age or until the infant reaches the upper weight and height limit for that particular seat.

    ii. Front-facing car seats. When infants move into front-facing car seats, they should remain in those seats through 4 years of age. However, it is safest to stay in a front-facing car seat until the height and weight limit of the seat is reached or the seat no longer fits.

    iii. Booster seats. Once children outgrow a front-facing car seat, they should use a booster seat until they are big enough for the seat belt to fit correctly. Most children need to remain in booster seats through at least 8 years of age. Children can stop using a booster seat when they can sit with their back against the seat back while their legs bend over the end of the seat. A seat belt fits properly when the lap belt lays across the upper thighs and the shoulder belt fits across the middle of the child’s shoulder and chest. This typically occurs when the child is 4’9” tall and between 8 and 12 years of age.

    e) Have all children under age 13 sit in the back seat.

    f) Never seat a child in front of an air bag.

    g) Place children in the middle of the back seat when possible, because it is the safest spot in the vehicle.

    h) Try your car seat before you buy it, fix the restraint into the car as tightly as you can and check that it doesn’t move to the front or side and make sure the seat buckle doesn’t rest on the frame of the child seat. If you are having problems with your car seat you can try a different position in the car. If your childminder or a grandparent takes your child in their car, make sure that they are using the right seat and that they put your child in it properly on every journey. If you give them your seat when you drop off your child, be sure that it fits their car and they know how to use it.

    i) Seats with ISOFIX attachments are easier to install in cars than those that rely on the adult seat belt. Also, they are usually more secure. Check to see if you can fit an ISOFIX seat into your car.

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